• The facade of the National Library of Scotland.

A century of temperance in alcohol policy and licensing law

By Stuart MacLennan “Crackdowns” on alcohol my well be de rigueur, but they are most certainly not novel. The early 20th century provides the genesis for many contemporary alcohol restrictions, with the temperance movement having achieved considerable influence over public…

When conservation is not enough

By Dominic Hinde In its nine years in power, Scotland’s Scottish National Party (SNP) government has sought to redefine many areas of how the country is governed. In many fields, from healthcare to education, the party has attempted to create…

Play, Scale and Literature

By Ivan Callus Recent work across literary theory has placed questions of scale in the foreground of critical debate. What is it that’s at stake? Cast your mind back to your childhood engagement with scales of the world, in play.…

Baudelaire in strange places

What has a nineteenth-century French poet got to do with 1960s American electronica? The poet Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) published his controversial verse poetry collection Les Fleurs du mal in 1857, followed by his innovative prose poem works. His poetry has…

The Devils Reconsidered

By Christophe Van Eecke Ken Russell is often considered more or less the court jester of British film history, and his films have not always been taken quite as seriously as they deserve. This holds true even of The Devils…

David Hume and Scottish Philosophy

By Gordon Graham Not so very long ago, it was quite widely accepted that Britain’s most significant contribution to the development of philosophy was ‘empiricism’ and that its great exponents were the Englishman John Locke, the Irishman George Berkeley, and…