• A photograph of a drawing of a crowd watching a theatrical performance inside a nineteenth-century style theatre hall

What Is the Point of Literary Criticism?

Anglophone literary criticism has over the last decade engaged in a searching analysis and critique of its own methods. Perhaps surprisingly, much of that debate has considered *how* one should engage in literary interpretation—whether one should read closely or from a distance, interpret in a paranoid or reparative way, emphasize the work’s surface or depth, engage in “critique” or some other mode of attachment—and rather less *why*. But we might benefit from asking that question more openly: what, after all, is the point of literary criticism? Why does this practice merit the sustained intellectual energy so many scholars have devoted to it?

CounterText is five years old

CounterText: A Journal for the Study of the Post-Literary is five years old! To celebrate the occasion, Edinburgh University Press and the journal’s editorial team (based at the Department of English at the University of Malta) have put together a…

Irish University Review turns 50!

Irish University Review, the leading journal dedicated to Irish literary criticism, turns 50 this year, and to celebrate, we have launched a virtual issue that is available to read for free online until the end of the year. Articles have…

Free EUP content this month: September 2019

Read on to find out about the latest research content you can access and read for free this month, from journal articles, to free sample chapters and open access books spanning across a range of our core subject areas. Film,…

Wordsworth’s Reading of George Berkeley

by Chris Townsend The Irish philosopher George Berkeley was not a contemporary of William Wordsworth — he died in 1753, almost thirty years prior to Wordsworth’s birth — but his philosophical and spiritual thinking still exerts a traceable influence over…